G7 agree to set AI code of conduct

Key Takeaways:

– G7 countries are working on a voluntary code of conduct for artificial intelligence (AI) to discuss and mitigate risks.
– The code aims to promote safe and trustworthy AI globally and provide guidance for organizations developing advanced AI systems.
– The European Union is close to signing the world’s first legal regulation on AI, known as the AI Act.
– The G7 code will be agreed upon just before the UK AI Safety Summit, which aims to discuss risks and establish frameworks of AI regulation.
– There are doubts about international regulation due to China’s attendance uncertainty, but experts see it as a step towards greater regulation and cooperation.

TechRadar:

A voluntary code of conduct concerning artificial intelligence (AI) is to be agreed between the Group of Seven industrial countries (G7).

The G7 members have been working on forming a set of guidelines since May this year as a means of discussing the risks posed by AI and mitigating potential misuse.

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AI Eclipse TLDR:

The Group of Seven industrial countries (G7) is set to agree on a voluntary code of conduct regarding artificial intelligence (AI). The G7 members, including the US, Canada, Britain, Italy, France, Germany, and Japan, have been working on forming guidelines since May to address the risks and potential misuse of AI. The code aims to promote safe and trustworthy AI worldwide, providing voluntary guidance for organizations developing advanced AI systems. With the release of more powerful AI tools, the risks of misuse and failures increase, requiring companies to adopt stronger security procedures. The European Union is also working on the AI Act, the world’s first legal regulation on AI, to regulate different levels of risk and safeguard EU citizens. The G7 code of conduct will be agreed upon just days before the UK AI Safety Summit, which aims to discuss AI risks and establish national and international frameworks for AI regulation. While there are doubts about the possibility of international regulation, experts view this as a small step towards greater regulation and cooperation.