Google’s AI powerhouse finds millions of new crystals that could change the fate of humanity forever — and, for better or worse, it is just getting started

Key Takeaways:

– Researchers at Google DeepMind have used artificial intelligence to discover new crystals and inorganic materials
– They found 2.2 million new crystals, including 380,000 stable materials
– The discovery could have a significant impact on the development of technologies like computer chips, batteries, and solar panels
– The GNoME AI tool dramatically increases the speed and efficiency of material discovery by predicting stability
– The new materials have the potential to develop transformative technologies like superconductors and next-generation batteries
– Traditional AI-based approaches to finding crystal structures have been expensive and time-consuming
– GNoME’s discovery of 2.2 million materials is equivalent to 800 years’ worth of knowledge
– The project aims to drive down the cost of discovering new materials
– Google DeepMind plans to release its database of newly discovered crystals and share its findings with the research community.

TechRadar:

Researchers at Google DeepMind have used artificial intelligence to discover new crystals and inorganic materials that could power future technologies as part of a landmark study

Using the Graph Networks for Materials Exploration (GNoME) deep learning tool, researchers found 2.2 million new crystals, including 380,000 stable materials. 

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AI Eclipse TLDR:

Researchers at Google DeepMind have used artificial intelligence (AI) to discover millions of new crystals and inorganic materials that could power future technologies. They utilized the Graph Networks for Materials Exploration (GNoME) deep learning tool and found 2.2 million new crystals, including 380,000 stable materials. This discovery has the potential to revolutionize the development of modern technologies such as computer chips, batteries, and solar panels, which rely on stable inorganic crystals. Traditional AI-based approaches to finding novel crystal structures have been time-consuming and costly, whereas the GNoME tool dramatically increases the speed and efficiency of discovery by predicting the stability of new materials. The researchers believe that among the discovered materials are promising candidates for experimental synthesis, which could lead to the development of transformative technologies like superconductors, supercomputers, and next-generation batteries. The findings were published in the journal Nature, and the project aims to drive down the cost of discovering new materials by providing scientists with a catalog of promising recipes.